• Instructional Program, In-Person

    Overview

    The In-Person Workgroup is charged with determining which models may be an option for next school year after weighing the benefits and challenges of the variety of learning scenarios.

    Guiding Question: "Within state parameters and our physical building spaces, and within our guiding values, what do we recommend in-person education looks like when school starts?”

    Workgroup Tasks

    1. review various learning models and evaluate the challenges and constraints of each
    2. make a recommendation for a model

    Workgroup Membership

    Leads:

    • Ken Collins - Assistant Superintendent of Teaching & Learning
    • Gina Anderson - Executive Director of Instructional Leadership
    • Keri Joseph - Director of Special Education

    Members:
    Parents, teachers, district and building administrators, union representative, department leaders, learning specialists, paraeducators, and special education teachers

    Meeting Goals

    July 14 - Develop a deep understanding of the various "hybrid" models that are available, and begin to examine the advantages and disadvantages of each model

    July 1 - Build common understanding of health and safety constraints, learned about various model options, and surface hopes and fears for what our instructional program will look like when students and staff return

  • July 27 Meeting Synopsis

    Posted by Lake Stevens School District on 7/27/2020 6:15:00 PM

    The workgroup finalized their recommendation for a hybrid model of distance learning + in-person instruction when it is safe to implement this model:

    1. Students in Kindergarten through second grades, as well as those students are far from educational justice (students with disabilities, homeless students, English language learners, and students receiving individualized support for behavior or social/emotional needs) will attend Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday for in-person instruction. Wednesdays will be distance-learning for students, and teacher planning, collaboration, and possibly targeted instruction for struggling learners.
    2. All other students will learn through a split-schedule program, with students attending in-person instruction two days a week, and engaging in distance learning three days a week. The in-person instructional days would happen on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, with Wednesday being a day for teacher planning, collaboration, and possibly targeted instruction for struggling learners. Students will be divided into Cohort A and Cohort B, with Cohort A attending in-person on Monday and Tuesday, and Cohort B attending on in-person instruction on Thursday and Friday.
    3. Students at grades 6-12 will attend a three-period day on a quarter system.

    Next steps: This recommendation will go to the administrative team next week, after teachers and support staff have provided additional input. The admin team will analyze the rationale behind the workgroup's recommendation as well as the staff input, and make adjustments as necessary. Additionally, district staff will be surveyed on the recommendations. The final recommendation created by the administrative team will to the School Board for consideration on August 12.

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  • July 21 & 23 Meeting Synopsis

    Posted by Lake Stevens School District on 7/22/2020 6:00:00 PM

    The workgroup began to narrow and refine our recommendations for a hybrid model in the event that we cannot safely reopen full time this fall.

    We began the meetings by reiterating the purpose of this committee: to define what our plan looks like when we do return. We discussed that if it is not yet safe to return to any in-person instruction in September, we will open with full-time, remote digital learning. But, there will come a time when it is safe to open again, and so our job is to define what it will look like when we do return, following the current safety guidelines.

    The group is leaning towards a model that combines phased-in instruction for cohorts of students at the elementary level (likely K-2), as well as for struggling learners in older grade levels (for example, students who receive special education services, or students who are far from educational justice). These phased-in students would attend in-person instruction four days a week, likely Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, with Wednesday being a day for teacher planning, collaboration, and possibly targeted instruction for struggling learners.

    For all other students, the workgroup is leaning towards a split schedule program, with students attending in-person instruction 2 days a week, and engaging in distance learning three days a week. Likely, the in-person instructional days would happen on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, with Wednesday being a day for teacher planning, collaboration, and possibly targeted instruction for struggling learners. The group is also wrestling with the advantages and disadvantages to reducing the number of classes students in grades 6-12 take during the course of a day, possibly adopting a quarter system instead of a semester system.

    In the next meeting, the group will further refine the model recommendation(s), ensuring that the recommendation(s) match our district's guiding beliefs around instruction in COVID times.

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  • July 16 Meeting Synopsis

    Posted by Lake Stevens School District on 7/20/2020 10:00:00 AM

    The workgroup continued to examine various "hybrid models" that are being adopted in districts in the event that schools cannot safely reopen full time this fall (see notes from July 14 for more information).

    At the last meeting, the group identified advantages and disadvantages of a hybrid model which brings back certain grade levels (likely at the elementary) for in-person instruction four days a week (called "phased in"), and a "rotating schedule" for all other grade levels.

    Today, the group used the same process to examine a similar model, but one that brings back students for in-person instruction not based on their grade level, but on their level of need.

    The group also examined a model which would adjust the number of classes secondary students take in a day from six periods to three periods by extending the length of the class periods. This would allow for more "cohort" grouping and minimize cross-contamination. Students would still earn the same amount of credit over the course of a semester. However, they would take three classes for 9 weeks, and their remaining three classes for 9 weeks.

    The workgroup also examined a model that provides both in-person "phased in" instruction at certain grade levels and a rotating schedule for other grade levels, but that provides that instruction five days a week using a shortened day rather than four days a week.

    At the next meeting on July 21, the group will narrow the options and begin to hone in on 1 or 2. The group will also decide whether it is best for LSSD students, staff, and families to create yet another version of a hybrid model by taking the best elements from many different models and creating our own.

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  • July 14 Meeting Synopsis

    Posted by Lake Stevens School District on 7/15/2020 10:00:00 AM

    In the weeks leading up to the July 14 meeting, group members spent time learning about the "pure" and the "hybrid" models of reopening provided by OPSI if schools cannot open full time in the fall for all students:

    1. Split or rotating schedules + distance learning
    2. Phased-in opening + distance learning
    3. Continue solely distance learning
    4. Hybrid model - a combination of two or more of the aboveoptions

    Based on our classroom size and average class size, we may be able to bring students back for in-person instruction at some grade levels (option B: "phased-in opening" + distance learning). However, it is unlikely that this can happen at all grade levels. Thus the committee is examining ways to combine both "phased in" and "split or rotating schedules" into a hybrid model (option D).

    Today, the group identified the advantages and disadvantages of one common hybrid model districts are considering: combining phased in learning at lower grade levels, and a split schedule at the upper grade levels.

    The group referred to three guiding questions as they identified the advantages and disadvantages to the various models:

    1. For whom does this model work well?
    2. For whom does this model not work well?
    3. What would be required to make this model work?

    At the next meeting on July 16, the group will examine the three other most common hybrid models, again by first deeply understanding the models, and then by identifying the pros and cons of each possible model.

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  • July 1 Meeting Synopsis

    Posted by Lake Stevens School District on 7/8/2020 12:00:00 PM
    1. To build common understanding, the group learned about various scenarios that are recommended by OSPI.

      "Cohort planning" is keeping groups of students together for longer parts of the day in order to minimize cross-contamination. At the elementary level, this is fairly easy since most students are already in one classroom all day long. At the secondary level, where in the traditional model students move from class to class throughout the day, it is more of a challenge.

      "Hybrid models" are a combination of in-person and online learning. This could include schedules where students attend in-person learning on certain days of the week, and take part in distance learning on the days when they are not physically at school. A version of a "hybrid model" could also include adjusting the school day or class periods within a school day. For example, rather than secondary students attending six, hour-long classes per day, they could attend three, two-hour classes per day on a quarter system rather than a semester system. Then, at the end of the quarter, students take their other three classes in two-hour chunks of instruction. This way, by the end of two quarters, students will have successfully earned their full credit and still be on track for graduation.

      Yet another scenario is a "phased in" model, whereby certain groups of students come back to in-person learning before others. For example, students in kindergarten through fifth-grade could come back all day, every day, while students in grades 6-12 could come back on an alternate schedule that incorporates both in-person and online, distance learning.
    2. In making its recommendation on what an alternate schedule in our district this fall could look like, this group will consider all of the options listed above, as well as important pieces of information regarding OSPI regulations (PDF) around physical distancing, as well as how many students can safely come back to school and in what ways could this be accomplished, given the Reopening Work Group's guiding beliefs that as much in-person instruction as possible, while still following safety guidelines, is paramount.
    3. Lastly, the group engaged in an activity to surface its hopes and fears around what school will look like this fall in order to provide further guidance in making recommendations for our model.

    Four subsequent meetings will be scheduled starting the week of July 13.

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